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E-mail: info@farnwr.org

Upcoming Events, Walks and Programs

Click on an event in the calendar to see the details on the event.
 

Note that most of our Monthly Meetings are recorded. Links to the recordings hosted by SudburyTV can be found on the Past Event Videos page.

Thursday, March 19, 7:00 PM

Invasive Species Management from Local and National Perspectives

With Karen Riggert with Assabet Pulling Together and Katrina Scheiner who is "Doing Battle with the Yellow Crazy Ant in the Remote Pacific."

Over 700 nautical miles southwest of Honolulu, HI, Johnston Atoll NWR is one of the most remote atolls on the planet. Sadly even such remote islands aren't immune to invasive species and in January 2010, an infestation of yellow crazy ants (Anoplolepis gracilipes) was found on Johnston Island. Not much is known about yellow crazy ants (YCA), but they are highly mobile and easily invade new areas. Once established they can wreak havoc on the populations of nesting seabirds, who suffer skin irritation, blindness, and loss of reproductive success as a result of the ants’ invasion. Johnston provides some of the only non-rat-infested nesting habitat for seabirds in about 750,000 square miles of ocean and so by August of 2010 a plan had been devised and the first Crazy Ant Strike Team (CAST) was assembled and deployed to the island. Since then, crews of five have been studying the ants and have managed to reduce the population by 99%, but still continue to work towards eradicating the pest. Katrina Scheiner is the CAST crew leader for 2014 and 2015.

Following Katrina's presentation, Karen Riggert will talk about the invasive species management at the refuge during the first year of the Assabet Pulling Together (APT). Thanks to hardworking volunteers APT is making way for natives on the refuge by removing invasive plants.

Friday, March 20, 3:15 PM

Signs of Spring Hike

Welcome in the first day of spring by looking for and learning about evidence of spring. How does wildlife transition? What predictions can we make about this upcoming spring? Let’s celebrate spring with poems and songs. Depending on snow this hike will be at least one mile.

Please RSVP to Kizette at kizette_ortizvanger@fws.gov or 978-562-3527 x 117 for the hike so we know to expect you.

Sunday, March 22, 3:00 - 5:00 PM

Nature Walk: A Sense of Place at Great Meadows NWR

Join naturalist Cherrie Corey for her continuing exploration of the Great Meadows Wildlife Refuge landscape. the warming sun, singing birds, and fattening buds reassure us that spring is poised to blossom, even as the snow slowly recedes. Join Cherrie to greet the flowers, water creatures, and returning birds that fill the refuge with exuberant life each spring. Dress in layers, the refuge trails are often 10º cooler than more protected areas in springtime. Rubber boots or waterproof footgear are recommended in March and April. Bring binoculars and cameras if you have them.

For each walk, a $5/person voluntary donation is requested. No pre-registration required. Meet at the information kiosk by the parking lot, Great Meadows NWR in Concord (Monsen Rd, off Rte. 62, driveway on left where road curves right). Questions? see sense-of-place-concord.blogspot, email cherrie.corey@verizon.net or call 978-760-1933. Co-sponsored by the Friends of the Assabet River NWR, Musketaquid Arts and Environment Program, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Wednesday, March 25, 7:00 PM

Friends Monthly Speaker Series with Eileen McGourty and Marianne Piché talking about New England Cottontails of Massachusetts

Join U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Wildlife Biologist Eileen McGourty and MA Division of Fisheries & Wildlife Habitat Biologist Marianne Piché for a presentation about the Conservation Strategy for the New England Cottontail Rabbit.

As this species is a candidate for protection under the Endangered Species Act, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is partnering with the Massachusetts Division of Fisheries & Wildlife to implement conservation efforts. This talk will include details about Eileen’s work within the Eastern Massachusetts National Wildlife Refuge Complex related to rabbit surveys, and a trapping and tracking project in Mashpee where both Eastern and New England cottontails were tracked in order to determine habitats being used by the rabbits, and to determine home range size. Marianne will also discuss habitat management techniques taking place on federal, state, tribal, and private land in areas where New England Cottontail occur.

The Friends of the Assabet River NWR holds its monthly speaker series on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the US Fish and Wildlife Services' Eastern Mass. Visitor Center, 680 Hudson Road, Sudbury MA 01776 (Google Map). Talks are free and open to the public.

Friday, March 27, 10:30 - 11:30 AM

Refuge Fledglings Hour — Nature-themed Program Series for Kids

Join Refuge staff for Refuge Fledglings Hour, a nature-themed program series that includes crafts, stories, and games or songs that relate to a different topic each month. This month we will talk about tunnels in the snow. Concentrating on mice, voles, red squirrels, and weasels, we will talk about how the snow protects these small animals from the cold and predators as they scramble on that layer between frozen earth and snow making tunnels as they look for food. If the weather is nice and enough snow has melted we will go outside in search of the remains of snow tunnels, so please have your children bring hats, coats, mittens, and boots.

Programs are usually held the 4th Friday of every month from 10:30am – 11:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year olds; siblings welcome. Held at the Visitor Center. Program is limited to 25 kids so registration is required; please contact Kizette at kizette_ortizvanger@fws.gov or 978-562-3527 x 117 to RSVP.

Saturday, March 28, 1:00 PM

Wildlife Emergence: The Transition to Spring

One of the most amazing times of year is now, when winter is changing into spring and everything is coming back to life. Come learn more about all the animals coming out for spring. From the mammals emerging from their burrows after a long sleep to the birds flying back from their homes in the south. We will end with a nature walk to spot some signs of spring.

Families are most welcome. Please RSVP to Kizette at kizette_ortizvanger@fws.gov or 978-562-3527 x 117 for the hike so we know to expect you.

Wednesday, April 1, 7:00 PM

Eyes on Conservation - Speaker Series

Gray Seal Pups on Muskeget and Monomoy Islands

Gordon Waring, Ph.D., Research Fishery Biologist at NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center heads the seal research program. He will discuss his findings on capturing, tagging, sampling and releasing gray seal pups on Muskeget Island and Monomoy National Wildlife Refuge. Wendy Puryear, Ph. D., Research Scientist at MIT will co-lead discussion on the value this provides to understanding influenza in marine mammals.

Saturday, April 4, 7:00 - 8:30 PM

Woodcock Watch at Great Meadows NWR

The earliest signs of spring are here! Join us for a dusk viewing to see the male woodcock's aerial courtship display at 73 Weir Hill, Great Meadows NWR in Sudbury. Listen for the woodcock "peents" and see the male in full flight in display.

Contact jmilhaven@gmail.com to reserve a space.

Friday, April 10, 3:00 - 4:30 PM

Eyes on Conservation - Speaker Series

Introduction to Vernal Pools for Kids

Kids will learn about the importance of vernal pools and the organisms that call it home. After the indoors portion, we will explore a nearby vernal pool. Program open to 5 year olds and older; siblings welcome.

Program will happen even with rain! Please contact Kizette at kizette_ortizvanger@fws.gov or 978-562-3527 x 117 to RSVP.

Sunday, April 12, 3:00 - 5:00 PM

Nature Walk: A Sense of Place at Great Meadows NWR

Join naturalist Cherrie Corey for her continuing exploration of the Great Meadows Wildlife Refuge landscape. the warming sun, singing birds, and fattening buds reassure us that spring is poised to blossom, even as the snow slowly recedes. Join Cherrie to greet the flowers, water creatures, and returning birds that fill the refuge with exuberant life each spring. Dress in layers, the refuge trails are often 10º cooler than more protected areas in springtime. Rubber boots or waterproof footgear are recommended in March and April. Bring binoculars and cameras if you have them.

For each walk, a $5/person voluntary donation is requested. No pre-registration required. Meet at the information kiosk by the parking lot, Great Meadows NWR in Concord (Monsen Rd, off Rte. 62, driveway on left where road curves right). Questions? see sense-of-place-concord.blogspot, email cherrie.corey@verizon.net or call 978-760-1933. Co-sponsored by the Friends of the Assabet River NWR, Musketaquid Arts and Environment Program, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

Thursday, April 16, 7:00 PM

Eyes on Conservation - Speaker Series

Protecting Rare Shorebirds in Massachusetts: South Beach, Chatham - a Piping Plover Hotspot

Mass Audubon's Coastal Waterbird Program is one of the most effective entities working to protect coastal birds and barrier beaches in New England. Launched in 1987 in response to declining populations of Piping Plovers and terns in Massachusetts, the Coastal Waterbird Program’s primary objective is to protect nesting and foraging areas throughout the state. Since its first year, the program has successfully helped to recover the Massachusetts population of Piping Plovers from 135 pairs in 1986 to 700 pairs in 2012. Massachusetts is integral to the recovery of the federally threatened Atlantic Coast population of the Piping Plover, supporting roughly one-third of the breeding population. The Coastal Waterbird Program monitors and protects 180 nesting sites on the Massachusetts coastline and protects approximately 40% of the state's Piping Plovers, 50% of Massachusetts Least Terns, and 20% of Massachusetts American Oystercatchers. In addition, the program is instrumental in the protection of Roseate Terns during the months after breeding when the birds are preparing for migration. Although the primary focus of the program at its inception was the protection of the most threatened species of coastal birds, today, the Coastal Waterbird Program advocates for the protection of the entire coastal ecosystem and serves as a model for integrated coastal resource management.

Katharine C. Parsons is Director of Mass Audubon’s Coastal Waterbird Program which partners with 50 communities in the Commonwealth to protect nesting shorebirds and terns.

Wednesday, April 22, 7:00 PM

Friends Monthly Speaker Series with Shawn Carey talking about Eastern Massachusetts Hawk Watch : Conservation and Preservation of Hawks by Monitoring Migration in Massachusetts

Shawn Carey, from the Eastern Massachusetts Hawk Watch, an all-volunteer, member-based organization whose mission is to promote the study, conservation and preservation of hawks, will share information about EMHW and the monitoring of hawk migration in Massachusetts. He will also show a short video "Looking Skyward" A Passion for Hawkwatching by Shawn Carey and Jim Grady. This video examines why people watch hawks, explains some of its long, storied history, and explores some of the prime locations for viewing hawk migration (Hawk Mountain and Cape May). Video footage includes a wide range of raptors in flight as well as interviews with Pete Dunne, Bill Clark, and others.

Founded in 1976, EMHW is an all-volunteer, member-based organization whose mission is to promote the study, conservation and preservation of hawks locally and on a continental scale by monitoring migration in Massachusetts; to share data for research and conservation purposes; to promote education and awareness of the identification of hawks and the issues related to migrating hawks and to instill an appreciation for hawks in general.

Shawn P. Carey (Migration Productions) produces bird/wildlife related Multi-media Presentations that have been presented at many natural history events all over the United States. Migration Productions has been presenting programs to birding organizations, natural history events and camera clubs all over the United States. Shawn's photographs have been published in the New York Times, Boston Globe, Science magazine, Mass Audubon Sanctuary Magazine and Hawk Mountain Sanctuary just to name a few.

In 1997 he started teaching bird photography workshops (Fundamentals of Bird Photography) for the Massachusetts Audubon Society. He works full time as the Operations Manager at AVFX in Boston, MA.

The Friends of the Assabet River NWR holds its monthly speaker series on the fourth Wednesday of each month at the US Fish and Wildlife Services' Eastern Mass. Visitor Center, 680 Hudson Road, Sudbury MA 01776 (Google Map). Talks are free and open to the public.

Friday, April 23, 1:00 PM

Film: Disneynature's Bears and Kids Program

From Disneynature, the studio that brought you Earth and Chimpanzee, comes Bears - an epic story of breathtaking scale. Showcasing a year in the life of a bear family, mother Sky teaches her two impressionable cubs, Amber and Scout about life’s most important lessons (78mins).

Through discussion and a game, kids will come to better understand what bears need to survive and what limits them.

Friday, Aprl 24, 10:30 - 11:30 AM

Refuge Fledglings Hour — Nature-themed Program Series for Kids

Join Refuge staff for Refuge Fledglings Hour, a nature-themed program series that includes crafts, stories, and games or songs that relate to a different topic each month. This month we’ll look at a day in the life of a fish.

Programs are usually held the 4th Friday of every month from 10:30am – 11:30 AM. For 2 to 5 year olds; siblings welcome. Held at the Visitor Center. Program is limited to 25 kids so registration is required; please contact Kizette at kizette_ortizvanger@fws.gov or 978-562-3527 x 117 to RSVP.

 

Outdoors This Week

The Friends posts our events to Outdoors This Week, a weekly listing of outdoor activities located west of Boston sponsored by local environmental organizations. Click here to subscribe.

Contact: info@farnwr.org